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in foreign policy, you highlight the threat from home grown terror, from self-radicalized extremists. you suggest that the government should, one, intervene in areas between radical beliefs and violent behaviours. it should instill trust in communities where alienation is likely and integrate a whole of government approach that embodies u.s. values, can you give us the short version. >> possessing radical beliefs is protected by our constitution. that is what freedom. speech and association is about. the first amendment to our constitution. it's a core value of the united states, one which many aspire to have and observe. that's all fine. what is not fine is when possessing radical beliefs inspires the person with those beliefs, or someone he or she talks to to engage in violence behaviour. that is not protected by the constitution. the difficult challenge for government is to know when to intervene to prevent somebody from harming the rest of us, just because that person has radical beliefs. that intervention area is hard to identify. the danger is that you end up suppressing people's fr
so much. president obama in his typical foreign-policy challenges are being magnified by recent events in afghanistan. president hamid karzai refuses to sign a security agreement with the united states that would define american military presence in his country at the end of the year. but he did agree to a new agreement with iran. he agreed in principle to a friendship and cooperation path dealing with security and economic issues and within hours of that agreement, he was also already calling for the removal of american forces from the area. he said that we believe that all foreign forces should leave the region and the security of afghanistan should be handed over to people of the country. the so-called moderate has aalowed executions to surge since he took office, with more than 300 people executed since just the month of august. iran is the leader in executions. president obama and other dignitaries are on their way to south africa to attend tomorrow's memorial service from nelson mandela. hitching a ride on air force one with the president and michele obama, former presiden
particularly with of democrats. normally democrats who would give the president more foreign policy as sensitive as the diplomacy with iran has been. power to veto legislation. to the pentagon policy bill, that's going to be problem mattic. so, you know, the veto is out there, but if it's not a stand alone sanctions bill, they're a lot of work to do to convince congress and most importantly democrats not to join. thanks for getting up this and watching us on the washington journal. >> thank you for taking my call. i get my news is rt or press tv.com. i'm an independent now. i used to be a die hard republican. but my priority has changed how the country changed to foreign policy. i thought obama -- even though i voted for the party at ron paul to ron republicans did paul at the convention was disgusting. the party because -- took over the republican party. that's a jewish movement. controls the foreign policy. is led by the nose by netanyahu and they were horrible. who's the biggest influence the white house outside of the political realm. >> strong opposition to iran at iran deal.o
issues than any foreign policy issues. the current climate is still such that people aren't really worried about what is happening in iran as much as their backyard. >> quickly, joe biden is going on an asian tour at a time when things are really critical with china and japan. >> you will be landing in tokyo to remind his friends in asia, china, japan, south korea that they aren't being neglected. stays calmerything over there. >> thank you. >> tonight's game has wrapped up at fedex field between the redskins and the giants. it came down to the wire and sadly, the redskins continued their losing streak. britt mchenry with the details. >> it has been a tough one. depressing for washington fans than the actual game tonight has to be this spot. sorry, guys. projected difficulty of the schedule, the skins are projected to have the second overall pick in next year's trapped. wait for it, it goes to st. louis for that rg iii pick trade. write down the field, alfred , 7-0 skins and they are cruising. goes downrter, rg iii for a 20-yard touchdown. griffin completed 16 to 17 passes in the f
-- american citizens take government officials who nor this reality when they pushed their foreign-policy agendas based on this. guest: thank you for your question and i disagree with your premise, which is that the world trade center was an inside job with explosives. there are the studies out there and it is pretty clear that the -- those buildings were attacked by planes that were hijacked by al qaeda operatives. i know there is a continuing conspiracy theory community out there that think this was some sort of nefarious scheme to -- it is hard to take of things seriously. i know you may genuinely believe it but i encourage you to go out there and engage in debates. i don't think the conspiracy theory holds any water. host: maurice from ohio, democrat's line. i have a question about -- let's sayear tomorrow they have a nuclear bomb. whatd of want to know would be the consequence, what the world would do about it as compared to pakistan having a nuclear bone, india having a nuclear bomb. what will the u.s. or the rest of the world do if iran says they have a nuclear bomb today? that is
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
. and the e.u. foreign policy chief is flying to kiev this week. as the cold closes in organizers need the crowd to stay on independent square. there may be safety in numbers. >> that is robben forest walker. >>> worsening smog in east china. smog conditions have closed several highways and grounded more than 20 flights for a short while. a lot of regions have been hit by heavy smog. environmental protection agency went to china to help out. >> it's more important than ever that we continue to work together. we know that pollution knows no boundaries, and we can be driven by our shared environmental challenges and priorities to layout a solid foundation and cooperation for the work ahead. >> she hopes the lessons learned here in the u.s. will serve as guidance for chinese officials work on its environment proble problems. >> reporter: if you just happened to book a flight you might want to call ahead before go to the airport. we have more. >> reporter: the arctic blasts now entering a second week is causing misery across the country. staying warm is not easy when there is ice, snow and
relations committee for 30 or 35 years, in the senate foreign policy was his biggest issue. he knows these subjects. he's have been experienced in them. he would be a good emissary. >> i think so. people tend to underestimate him this way. he does have the foreign policy experience. he's also very much a kind of one-on-one politician. what he's going over there to do is to defuse what is a toxic situation, and he's kind of the crisis manager. we've seen him perform this role -- >> i wouldn't say this in a way that's disrespectful. this should be handled at a lower pay grade. you may need the vice president to go talk to the chinese but to integrate a response from south korea and japan with the united states, that should be something that happens on the phone every day with lower level officials and it doesn't happen. >> it doesn't, and clearly this environment right now is very, very difficult. >> here's what he's trying to do. he's trying to send a powerful signal, the obama administration, to china and north korea. if you send a lower level person out there, that signal is going t
with a different type of foreign policy, a different approach of foreign policy. our tenant versus nos have not . he will insist on our rights. we will not compromise on the basic rights of our people. but the window of opportunity is a limited window. >> that was with iran's foreign minister. >>> alan gross was in north korea working on an internet project fo--incuba working on a. government. he was detained. libby casey has his story. >> alan gross' wife judy describes him as a man who wanted to help the world. >> he was very gregarious, very happy person, great personality, very, very warm. unfortunately, that's changed quite a bit in the past four years. people don't recognize him when they see pictures of him. >> decades of humanitarian work across the globe led the 60-year-old to cuba, the goal, setting up internet access for cuba's small jewish communities. now he languished in a jail cell. he has lost weight, his help, he feels like he has been forgotten and left to die. >> what could be worse than thinking your government isn't doing anything to bring you home. >> reporter: support
their foreign policy actually is. this is a perfect example where they have conflicting reports that confuse, oftentimes, our allies. when you come to foreign policy the most important thing you can do is have complete clarity. lou: administered by japan, as you certainly know well, for decades. and it is disputed territory in the sense that there are rich natural resources offshore. the chinese obviously want them. they're pretty important to our japanese allies as well. where does -- what is the smartest way to resolve this dispute? because it is certainly that. >> you are not going to completely resolve it because what you see is it is not just one area. china has been expanding their territorial claims. reseeded in the philippines. we see that the japanese. last year alone the japanese had to scramble their planes over 300 times because of chinese planes coming toward their territories. what we see in this particular situation, if we are going to try to attempt to stem and deal with it, the united states has to be very clear, have a strong presence because that is a very common in floods
was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizing it. so i don't want to get into a thing about is obama worse than bush. i covered those wars, i know what happened. under president obama i think what we have is someone who has sort of rebranded some of the more egregious aspects of the bush-cheney counterterror apparatus and i think has convinced himself that they're waging a smarter war. so they're relying on the drones much more than the bush administration did, using small team of coovert operators to conduct either kill or capture, and because guantanamo remains open despite the president's pledge to close it during his anytime office, i think that the obama administration doesn't want to capture too many people. so the kill-capture program has generally become a kill program. and so at the end of the day, i think the enduring legacy for president obama on the issues i
a diplomatic one. or as it was described to me at the time, we want to demilitarize our foreign policy, and you had a very forward-leaning point of view as it was perceived whereas hagel was seen as of a different view. first of all, is this assessment at all accurate? and second, what's happened in the ensuing months in terms of where they have gone on policies from iran to afghanistan as we were just discussing, does that, in fact, reflect this far more diplomatic and less military aapproach? >> i, i don't have a window into the president's decision making, but i, your explanation does not ring true to me, to my ears. i think chuck hagel has been close associate of president obama's since their time in the senate. of he served on the president's intelligence advisory board. i think there was a lot of discussion in the first term about finding a place for chuck hagel in the president's cabinet, and i think that that, you know, that discussion was naturally renewed when there was an opportunity to bring new people into the cabinet in the second term. so i think that is the president's, you know
story. >>> we're going to come back with our roundtable. we'll talk a little about foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this . >>> here now, some of this week's images to remember. >>> i did love the guy on twitter pour me coffee who wrote, good job today, sports. >> i'm still shell shocked. >> we're not talking about any more reports because we're running out of time. but you're here with first read sunday. a lot to look forward to in the week ahead. surely they can get a budget deal with everything going so well on health care. >> on december 13, house republican paul ryan when it comes to the budget, nancy pelosi, they have to come up with a top line number that they're agreeing to saying in order to avoid a shutdown in january. remember, we ran out of funding in january, so december 13 is when they have to come up with this line, and i don't want to get into sequester and all these issues, but it has come to just this very small agreement. i think they will. democrats have a little leverage here, david, because republica
foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this weekend opportunities aren't always obvious. sometimes they just drop in. cme group can help you navigate risks and capture opportunities. we enable you to reach global markets and drive forward with broader possibilities. cme group: how the world advances. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportuni
under president obama. bill: 54-56% disapprove to how the president is handling foreign policy. 2/3 in that pew survey believe americans view greater involvement in the global economy is a greater thing. meaning when america is a strong country it's better for the world. >> we have seen that throughout history. and when we see economies like china coming up it's important to have our own economy keep going. people like to complain about america, but when something happens in the world, the philippines, the typhoon there, when something happens in the world guess who is the first country to go, the united states military and the charities. we are divide as a country on political lines. republicans and democrats are split on how they see our influence in the world. the democrats believe the president has broken his promises. he said we would leave iraq, afghanistan and close guantanamo bay. republicans are saying don't be apologizing for guantanamo bay when you are on foreign tour. bill: what do you think the apology tour did to our view of ourselves in the world? >> when you have t
hill a board member at transafrica the oldest foreign policy organization in the united states. transafrica was at the heart of the anti-apartheid fight in the 1980's and she traveled with nelson mandel la o mandela on hp to the united states. thank verthank you very much fog us. >> urchyou are both uniquely positioned to talk about nelson mandela. what was your reaction to the news that nelson mandela passed. >> we all expected that he would pass in the immediate future but we are deeply saddened by the loss of one of the world's great greatest leaders and statesmen. all of us mourn with the south africans on this sad and tragic day. >> silvia your reaction. >> very much the same. dying is a part of life. but with such a spirit that had really taken such a role of seeking justice. it almost seemed like an era i knew in my heart of hearts that phase of struggle. >> let us keep our love together so that we form a solid form against racism. we are sure that that day comes now. while our common actions let them show that justice tr triums without delay. when that has come to pass,
and rejected the pact. eu leaders accused moscow of trying to secure ukraine's foreign policy reform. the fact that we have a synthetic partnership aggression does not mean that benny on dealing with another country we can't accept any kind of shark park involvement in the bilateral relations ukraine said it wanted more due monday but russell said it was sticking to the conditions it was offering with no new negotiations the government's decision to reject the deal fueled week long protest in ukraine thousands of opposition supporters took to the streets in numbers of cities calling for closer eu ties. will the summit was a success for two smaller countries jordan until the insight into the new partnership act the use of the door was still open to pray. if the president changes his mind. it's the disease. one of danny's nice celebrated christmas markets open and i'm back on friday the kids. i hang the christmas angel to admit that the traditional greeting the stock up on the day season. no that's not that dates back to the seventeenth century. it still will sell everything from decorations and
performance suffered when asked about his handling about healthcare and foreign policy. >>> in for a change in the weather. let's go to our chief meteorologist bill martin. there will be no mistaking this change. >> big changes. this is a cold weather system. cold systems from the arctic don't hold a lot of water so we are not expecting any rain. may get snow in the mountains. highs today, 69 antioch. enjoy what you are looking at because we won't see numbers like that for a while. temperatures off a good 5, 10 degrees and they will continue to drop. this weather system as it works its way down from the land mass, front edge here, moves into the bay area over night into tomorrow and we will get cold air settling in. over night lows chilly but there is wind out there and cloud cover. it won't be as cold as it will be into wednesday and thursday morning when we see freeze warnings. tonight increasing clouds out there. you are noticing those as i speak. we had clouds. fog this morning. a live camera shot of the golden gate bridge, you see fog. clouds move in and as they do that will deposit s
in recent years. 51% say the president is not tough enough in his approach to foreign policy. ! you how one organization is playing this story on the pew study. you can get the details on the al jazeera met -- on the al jazeera website. then there is this based on your survey, 70% of those surveyed said the u.s. command less respect than it did in the past, matching little scene toward the end of president george w. bush's second term. that was something that was also surprising to us because we also conduct our global attitude studies all over the world. the image of the united states is negative all end ofe world by the george w. bush presidency, then at that .70% of americans say the u.s. was less respected around the world than it has been in the past. when barack obama came into office, we know that around the world u.s. relations improved. about 56% say this was the case in 2009 and in 2012. today it is back to 70%. likely --s are more in the credits have not changed it is not just partisanship driving. but there was a partisanship story there. host: what do we gather from all of that
bethesda, maryland. thank you for being with us on c-span. the foreign-policy initiative discusses secretary of state john kerry's tenure so far. and the overall foreign-policy challenges the foreign -- obama faces.tration lac and we will talk about supreme court judges. and genetically modified foods with new york university professor marian nussle. we will look for your reaction by phone, e-mail, and twitter. tonight, republican senator rand paul of kentuckyak
. nobody had overturned a presidential veto on foreign policy in the 20th century. you had 37 and 53 republicans, including richard lugar who is still there. mitch mcconnell who said he was in college during civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from comme
in foreign policy. we don't get to choose our partners and we end up having to do business with lots of odeus regimes we may not like because they have things that we need. and so that involves tradeoffs between -- and those tradeoffs involve clashes between our interests, what we need, what we need to keep the world safe, and our values, things like human rights, democracy, caring about corruption, et cetera. and those tradeoffs are hard to make. sometimes we have to choose one rather than the other. >> specifically on afghanistan, it looks like what we're paying for is control and some influence in a part of the world where we need more of it. $13 billion a year is a lot of coin. >> it ills but this is -- part of the story with afghanistan, you break it, you own it. we invaded and tried too build up. we're spending a lot of money now trying to build up an afghan was so when we leave we don't there before we came in. and so it opportunity become a base for al qaeda or other international terrorist. >> i know that's what we're trying to do. whether we are we're gifting there is another matter
of that opportunity. we have a new government in iran with a different approach to foreign policy. they have not changed. we will insist on our rights. we will not negotiate or compromise on the rights of our people. we believe this can be addressed through constructive engagement. the window of opportunity is limited. >> israel is not impressed from comments from the iranian foreign minister. there's no shortage of finger pointing between the two countries. reaction from jerusalem, from nick schifrin. >> here in jerusalem the israelis are smarting over the terms and deal made with iran. israel tried privately and publicly to convince the u.s. not to make the deal. now it's trying to get the concessions it was trying to get earlier. they have four or five months to do that. earlier today i was talking to the spokeman for the foreign ministry and he described exactly what israel wants. >> the essentials is to dismantle capacity that iran can get for a peaceful program from abroad like other countries do. it will mean dismantling plutonium, it only serves for military purposes. it will have to
. it was the first override of a presidential veto on a foreign policy issue in the century. and anti-apartheid leaders credit those sanctions and credit the private divestment movement around the united states and around the world with bringing about the pressure and the isolation that was necessary to eventually humble the apartheid regime. to humble the ruling south african government and bring them to the negotiations that eventually freed nelson mandela and brought him into the apartheid system. the fight here to do that was nothing compared to the fight in south africa, but politically, it was a he can of a fight here too. joining us now is former california congressman and former oakland mayor, ron dellums. he was the sponsor of the 1986 antiapartheid act. congressman dellums, nice to see you. thank you very much for being here. >> it's an honor to be here. i'm one of your great fans, my friend. >> well, thank you. tell me what led you to sponsor the antiapartheid act in the 1986? >> a little-known fact in history is that a group of african-american employees of the polaroid co
of the civil rights movement in the 1960s, dr king had two or three other goals. adjust foreign policy, antiwar, peace movement in the war and political oppression. not only in this country but globally. also dr king had another goal. the poor people's march, poverty, number inequality. conversely nelson mandela south africa got rid of apartheid, they have black rule, but there are millions lacking in housing, jobs, high unemployment, health care disparities. in other words we see a parallel between dr king and nelson mandela - same issues, same problems, even after the end of apartheid. even after the end of legal segregation in this country. so important between looking at nelson mandela, and their legacies to under one thing. the problems that they - and their vision saw as being endemic and impacting poor african-americans, poor black south africans still had to be struggled against, fought against. in other words both of them saw that this was a battle that was not finished. the goals had not been attained. that's why when you talk about nelson mandela, and dr king, you join the two toot b
country. when he came to power, many wondered how he would steer the new country's foreign policy. after all the african national congress which he headed had been supported by the revolutionaries of the world. gadhafi, arafat, castro, but mandela knew what countries were in his best interests. he steered nit a pro democratic, pro western -- honoring his old comrades, never forgetting their support. his final act of greatness was leaving office. very few black african leaders had ever left office voluntarily in 1999 when nelson mandela did after just one term. he wanted to make sure that south african democracy didn't descend so -- he was in this sense south africa's george washington, as much as one man can shape's a country future, nelson mandela did it for south africa. and in doing so, he also shaped the consciousness of the entire world. let's get started. >>> let's go live to johannsberg to cnn's robin kernao. she joins us from outside his home in johannsberg, robin, there's a lot of talk about prayer and reflection. today's the day of prayer and reflection. there's lots of religi
would say the press was biassed against cheney. they didn't like his hawkish foreign policy and he was subject to more caricature than others. >> bill clinton probably feels he's been caricature. >> dick cheney didn't do a lot of media interviews. he worried about looking like he was in charge by being too public and that fed the image in a counter intuitive way. >> why did he talk to you. he has his own book out about his history of heart problems. designee spent a good amount of time with me. very generous with his time. i hope they believe his time sets the record straight for history much he was undefensive, very calm, he's got his point of view and he feels firmly about it. >> looking back as a guy that covered the bush administration and still covers the white house, how much did reporters know at the time about what was really going on behind closed doors or do we always have to wait for the books and for people to be out of office. >> my current theory is maybe we get 20%. >> 20%. >> of what's really getting on. we get large trust. elm missing a lot of what's going on. get
have a foreign policy which has a strat eachic period in this region. and we believe that we need. to in fact, contain the spread of sectarian divided in region. we believe sectarianism is dangerous for the entire region. iran is certainly not interested in promoting that. in fact, we have talked to everybody from the very first days of assuming. i visited iraq and the core of my discussion with all iraqis, post shiia, kurd and arab was the need to contain the sectarian divide. we believe that is a fire that can engulf the entire region and beyond and we believe it is in the interest of every single state in the region as well as all of the peoples of the region to build on our commonalities and we have a great deal of commonality. fighting in syria, the border with lebanon is escalating. seven children have been he can executed there. the badge for the town is still underway. andrew simmons has been talking to some of the eyewitnesses to the fight. this is the only way out for syrian refugees escaping the battle of calamon. the slow down on the trail of those crossing the border
that consideration. you can't undermine foreign policy. it will give obama time to see the deal through if it works and maybe they can go back and revert and say maybe they don't need to do sanctions. >> it is a work in progress, fluid situation. when we come back, members of the right flank would have you believe happy holidays is an affront to the way of life. culture warriors battle war on christmas, millions of americans fight just to have a christmas. we will discuss. i do a lot oresearch on angie's list before i do any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. for all those who sleep for all those who sleep too hot or too cool, now there's a solution. sleep number dual temp, the revolutionary temperature-balancing layer with active air technology that works on any mattress brand, including yours. it's only at a sleep number store, where this holiday season, the hottest sleep innovations make the coolest gifts - including sleep
. bret? >> domestically the administration has its hands full with obama care. on the foreign policy front, there is a potential bump in the road with iran sanctions in that there is a potential bipartisan deal in congress to move forward -- >> brett, right. we are hearing tonight that senator lindsey graham and several republicans joined by democratic senators, among them chuck schumer of new york, senior man in the democratic leadership, will hold a news conference on tuesday to announce they will introduce a bill that will apply more stringent sanctions on iran unless they meet a set of conditions within six months. far stronger than any imposed so far and would resemble the shape of what they hope will be the final outcome of the negotiation. if the negotiation don't get us there, these sanctions would take effect. >> that is embarrassing for the administration. >> it would be, if they say it strengthens the administration's hands. and the problem is these sanctions might easily pass the senate and if they pass the senate, they will almost certainly pass the house, forcing the pr
work on northern ireland. she was a foreign-policy adviser to the ted kennedy and i think mayor bloomberg on the right? an interesting combination. and she's written a couple of books, good books, and she is now working on the president's declassification efforts. so she knows a lot about those documents. so, welcome, nancy. great to be working with you again. [applause] >> we have an exciting panel for you, to give you first hand a chance to hear from those authors of the many documents that you have had out here. we are going to have a brief discussion from that of an albright -- madeleine albright. i won't take your time and introducing of them again. we will have a little discussion with them and then take a few questions from the audience and then wrap it up abou around 3:0t which point we will have a short break and then the president will come so let me invite the panel to come up. [applause] >> is this on? first we want to thank the clinton library and obviously stephanie streett. the peace process is something that we are all proud of. it one of his many lasting legacie
back with our roundtable. we'll talk a little about foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this weekend opportunities aren't always obvious. sometimes they just drop in. cme group can help you navigate risks and capture opportunities. we enable you to reach global markets and drive forward with broader possibilities. cme group: how the world advances. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect.
, foreign policy, our place in the world. that was top of mind. and it seems right now, and i want your thoughts, that young people have a lot of different things on their mind from the folks that you're conversing with here. what is this generation's association with the obama presidency? >> yeah. i mean, the big picture that we have seen is that young people are incredibly politically engaged. they voted in a larger percentage in 2012 and 2008, even though there was less enthusiasm about the obama administration the second time around. what we're seeing now is people waiting to make up their minds. i mean, the obama administration will be remembered by the outcome of this health care law. >> do you think more than anything else? >> more than anything else. and our generation will feel the impact of this law for the next two decades. so if we don't get this right, we're in big, big trouble. so for us i think now is the time to really dig in and see whether this law is good for us, and if not, how can we make it better, because this is going to impact us one way or the other for a long
for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948. even to now, apartheid is no longer a racial matter and social issues but economic, health care, educational, job apartheid is present even today, and he was simply saying that going into iraq was a preemptive strike, broke international law. as a matter of fact, the biggest demonstration in the history of the world took place that day, people saying do not invade iraq. now we admit that 100,000 plus iraqis have been killed, 6,000 plus americans have been killed, 50,000 plus injured, we were wrong. had th
-un is still not ready to meet anybody that has some substance, foreign policy background. he hasn't done that with the chinese. he hasn't done it with south koreans. again, it shows that he is probably right now spending his time consolidating his power, and he's replaced various generals from the old guard, keeping control of the military, the communist party. but what is so interesting is how publicly he humiliated his uncle in talking about his ouster. that they went out of their way to show that this was a very visible ouster. and i have never seen that done in north korea before with his father. they ousted people, but it was done on a more quiet basis. >> if dennis rodman leaves north korea with kenneth bay, the american sentenced to a long term, a prison sentence for apparently doing some missionary work, supposedly, in north korea, that would be encouraging to get the other american out, and dennis rodman would be praised if he were to leave together with kenneth bay, right? >> that's right. and rodman should concentrate on doing that. i don't think rodman takes my advice very we
in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign policy issue for the united states? >> it seems to me that we seem to forget apartheid in our own country. i was jailed for using the public library. i was jailed for trying to use -- my father -- lots of p.o.w.s didn't have the right to use toilets, hotels, motels. we couldn't use a toilet from texas to florida to maryland. we didn't have the right to vote. and so dr. king's victory was over skin color apartheid and political apartheid and changing world opinion. now, that same movement spilled over in a major way to be the impactful force for freedom in south africa against our own national policy at that time. we changed america's policy towards south africa by our own risk and sacrifice, because anti apartheid victory in america led to apartheid victory in south africa. >> rick, what do you think of that and the reverend's point about that interplay, relatively rare to have this kind of success and an international civil rights movement. >> well, we often forget that during the whole period of the cold war, there was actually a
with the council of foreign relations. book, "foreign policy begins at home." >> we have much more on jobs. we are going to be discussing companies, including apple versus samsung. >> good morning. it is jobs day. i am tom keene. with me is scarlet fu and alix steel. i am really looking at wages this morning. i want to see the wage dynamic. scarlet fu is looking maybe to build up the wage in bitcoins. >> a lot of people are wondering if it is in a bubble. alan greenspan believes so. to give mywant opinion. >> of course not. outlawed trading in the currency. bank of america initiated coverage with a target of $1300. matt dowd, political analyst, is with fast as guest host for the hour can you say this is something that washington needs to get up to speed on really quickly. >> i do not have concerns because i think -- that coin is the canary in the coal mine for what we will face in the next 10 years, cyber currency. there are lots of questions about whether or not there are algorithms and it can last over the course of the long haul, cyber currency is here to stay and somebody is going to be th
foreign policies was arrogant and racist. and he said moammar gadhafi, an international pariah at the time, was his friend. he went right ahead and visit gad da fi in tripoli. he was also friends with fidel castro. he vied him after he was rae leased from prison in 1990 and em based the cuban leader because of his support to end apartheid even while the rest of the world shunned castro for his communist dictatorship. in 2003, mandela joined those who were against the u.s.-led war against iraq, and not only called it a tragedy but said "what i am condemning is that one pow we are a president who has no foresight, who no can not think properly, is now wanting to plunge the world into a holocaust. "for those who will only see mandela as the gentle saint, remember, it was he himself who said, "i am no angel." instead, he was complex, imperfect, and human, and we do his memory more justice when we remember the entire man. joining me this morning, mark quarterman from the enough project, amy goodman, host and executive producer of democracy now, khalil mohammed, director of the schaumburg center
of for the healthcare.gov. should he fire someone? on foreign policy, a tweet -- he will be up on capitol hill to testify about that. there are headlines about that deal. the financial times this morning. is in chinasident and has met with japanese leaders as well. dianne feinstein and robert --endez vice president biden meeting on with asian leaders. we are talking about healthcare.gov. it somebody be fired over its failures? pennsylvania. republican. caller: good morning. i feel that the obama care fiasco has been ruining many people. my son, for instance. 62 years old -- he signed up for security and about two days later he got a letter that he had no more insurance. this is wrong. it is happening to everybody. the insurance companies must be relishing this problem. i think he is wrong and they do that he talks on both sides of his mouth. he tells us one thing and he knows he is going to do something else. i think he has been so unfair to a lot of the american public. i don't think he knows the constitution -- he does not believe in it. i am just so sorry for my son and my other children. i
came during a foreign policy conversation at a washington think tank forum. nbc's kristen welker is live for us at the white house. kristen, did the president successfully sell his deal today? >> reporter: well, craig, i think that remains to be seen. but that is what he was doing. he was trying to sell this deal to the skeptics here in the united states, but also to israelis, a lot of israeli journalists in the audience there today. if you look at the polls inside israel, a lot of folks don't like this deal. so president obama trying to convince them of the merits of this deal, making the point that, look, it is a test. it's a six-month freeze of iran's nuclear program that will be tested by inspectors who will go into the country and determine their level of seriousness. he also made the point that of the $100 billion worth of sanctions, this scales back about $7 billion of those, leaving the main sanctions in place. here's a little bit more of what he had to say this afternoon. take a listen. >> if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of
-- their foreign affairs. the obama administration has assertive in the realm of the next six policy -- domestic policy. regulatory actions that bush executive power beyond all limits. obama is the first president since richard nixon to ignore and enacted law simply because he disagrees with it. in place of the checks and balances established by the constitution, president obama that "i refuse to take no for an answer." "where congress won't act, i will." throughout the obama presidency, we have seen a pattern. president obama circumvents congress when he does not get his way. while congress is currently debating how to reform our immigration laws, the president effectively and acted himself byct ordering immigration officials to stop enforcing immigration laws against certain unlawful immigrants. get hiscouldn't preferred change to the no child left behind education law, he testing accountability provisions. when he objected to the work waiversent, he granted that are specifically forbidden by the statutory text. instead of working with congress to amend federal drug policy, he has instructed p
.s. foreign policy so they have to get on board at some point. later this week in bahrain, foreign ministers from the united states, from the u.k., gulf states, egypt will be meeting and sitting down. they invited their iranian counterpart as well. we can learn more about how this agreement is going to play out. >> yeah. so we'll have to see how that plans out, hadley. another follow-up. cutting things, that's interesting when we're wondering what was going to happen with iran. >> exactly. he gave me a wink. he said there was going to be fights with the ministries. he didn't want to touch education or hurt welfare basically spending. he doesn't want to hurt the israeli middle class because the middle class are the people that elected him. he's a former news man himself. he's coming in from the outside. he went after defense spending. it is a bit tricky when you're surrounded in the region, but he said it's something we have to take a look at. >> hadley, thanks for that. great stuff. the latest from tel aviv. still to come on "worldwide exchange." who needs twitter? i'm joined by the nasdaq s
talk about the foreign policy side of all of this, right? there is certainly a personal price. we see. we reached out to the white house by the way for comment, to see what happened to the letter that alan sent the president. we're waiting to hear about. when we get a response we'll share that with you. jon: seems like the government ought to do more for one of its enemployees. >>> searching for answers in the tragic death of paul walker. autopsy results are expected any moment. what they can tell us about the terrible crash that killed the hollywood star and his friend. hi, i'm terry and i have diabetic nerve pain. it's hard to describe, because you have a numbness, but yet you have the pain like thousands of needles sticking in your foot. it was progressively getting worse, and at that point i knew i had to do something. once i started taking the lyrica the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or
budget deal and number of challenging foreign policy issues. >> difficult for commuters in washington. snow, ice, rain has millions slipping and slide ago long the northeast coast. >> drivers from new york city to boston face the fine line between rain and freezing rain. this storm stretches from alabama all the way through new england. the philadelphia area has been especially hard hit. jenn of our philadelphia station kyw is in nearby brenmar. >> reporter: we were supposed to get a few inches yesterday. by mid afternoon we found ourselves in the middle of a full blown snowstorm. snow covered roads proved deadly after a driver was struck and killed after he got out of his car after a minor crash. the 50 car pileup left dozens stranded for hours on the turnpike. across the state, the storm's power took many by surprise. >> the storm came out of nowhere. it just hit us. >> reporter: drivers found themselves spinning out or maneuvering vehicles on foot. at philadelphia international airport, more than eight and a half inches of snow fell forcing the ground stop for fl
in hand on foreign policy, they're very close. >> they're the two democratic front-runners. who would the republicans fear more in a general election? >> i think hillary clinton is ultimately the more formidable democratic nominee. joe biden is widely seen as a democrat who does well with white working class voters. that's one reason why he was seen as a big asset to the obama ticket. that's one reason why he might, you know, prove relatively successful. but ultimately hillary clinton is someone to the surprise of some republicans who has a lot of appeal with women, particularly mod raterate and low-income women including some women who are republicans. hillary clinton has surprising crossover appeal. i'm not sure joe biden has the same crossover appeal particularly because he's been, frankly, so gaffe prone. >> juan carlos also asked the former president about comments he made saying that the current president, president obama, should honor his commitment to make sure if you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan. there seemed to be a little tension at the tim
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